Yves Rocher hints at Brexit concerns amid decision to exit UK

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Yves Rocher
// Yves Rocher to exit UK market
// French beauty retailer cited the economy as the reason behind the decision
// It will stop taking orders on March 14, 2 weeks before Brexit takes place

Yves Rocher has cited concerns over the economy as it announced its decision to close down its UK website and stop taking orders from the middle of next month.

While it has not blamed Brexit explicitly, its decision to stop taking orders on March 14 is two weeks before the UK officially divorces from the EU.

In a statement on its website, the French beauty retailer said “the economic context does not allow the Yves Rocher brand to continue trading in the UK anymore”.

According to SimilarWeb data, as reported by InternetRetailing, Yves Rocher’s online store sees 153 million page views globally each year.

Around half of that traffic derives from European Economic Area countries, and the UK comprises of just 0.5 per cent of the total.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. Ah, the reason for the Brexit mess – a total lack of understanding how the world works. Customs when UK exits the euro trading zone will significantly increase costs and transit time for all non UK based retailers. spoken as a US expat who is leaving London along with my job at the Euro clearing house while my Brit colleagues lose their jobs completely. Sweetie, empire is over. The sun has set on the British, via their own vote.

  2. brexit is a mess true, but when we do finally cut off our ties with the EU (not europe or the rest of the world) i suspect trading will carry on!!

    ‘keep calm and carry on’

  3. Brexit will never happen. This government is unbelievable, dishonest and has completely messed it up, we are now the laughing stock of the world,
    so the decision to stop trading was not a wise one, I am very disappointed.

  4. Brexit will happen, there will be hiccups but ultimately we’ll plough on regardless just as we did, quite successfully, before we joined the EU. We’ll continue to trade with the EU albeit in a smaller capacity. If we leave we’ll be open to trade with the Commonwealth countries (I include Canada, Australia, and New Zealand as Commonwealth countries ) Asia, China, Africa, other European countries not in the EU and of course America without restrictions. Leaving the EU is an inconvenience but if its navigated properly we can arguably be financially better off than we are now.

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