Lush to boycott Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and Snapchat

The cosmetics retailer Lush has announced a boycott of a number of social media outlets amid concerns over the safety of the platforms.
Lush tried to remove itself from Instagram and Facebook back in 2019.
// Lush announces it’s quitting some of its social media platform, citing the importance of mental health
// The policy is being rolled out across all 48 countries the retailer operates in

The cosmetics retailer Lush has announced a boycott of a number of social media outlets amid concerns over the safety of the platforms.

The Poole-headquartered business said it would be “turning its back” on Instagram, Facebook, TikTok and Snapchat on November 26 – until the platforms took action to provide a safer environment for users.

The policy is being rolled out across all 48 countries Lush operates in.


READ MORE: How are social media platforms venturing into physical retail?


The retailer said its “resolve” had been strengthened by recent information from “courageous” whistleblowers.

“We feel forced to take our own action to shield our customers from the harm and manipulation they may experience whilst trying to connect with us on social media,” the company said in a statement.

Lush co-founder and chief executive Mark Constantine said the retailer would “not be completely anti-social” and would find new ways to connect and communicate with customers.

Although the company is still planning to use Twitter and YouTube, it said.

“We’ve always got a lot to say, but when we climb onto a soapbox we like it to be safe,” said Constantine.

Lush tried to remove itself from Instagram and Facebook in 2019, but said “despite best intentions” had found itself back using the platforms.

“Like so many teenagers have experienced before us, Lush has tried to come off social media, but our FOMO is vast… So here we are again, trying to go cold (plant-based) turkey,” the company said.

“We wouldn’t ask our customers to meet us down a dark and dangerous alleyway – but some social media platforms are beginning to feel like places no one should be encouraged to go.”

The retailer is now calling on social media platforms to introduce stronger best practice guidelines, and said it was hoping international regulation would be passed into law.

Jack Constantine, chief digital officer and product inventor, said concerns about the serious effects of social media had gone largely ignored until now.

He added: “As an inventor of bath bombs, I pour all my efforts into creating products that help people switch off, relax and pay attention to their wellbeing.

“Social media platforms have become the antithesis of this aim, with algorithms designed to keep people scrolling and stop them from switching off and relaxing.”

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1 COMMENT

  1. Does Lush prefer sites like YouTube and Twitter where they can actively delete and hide comments on their own content?

    “Lush tried to remove itself from Instagram and Facebook in 2019, but said “despite best intentions” had found itself back using the platforms.”

    Haha. Complete hypocrites unable to stick to any principles. Take most customers advice: Stick to selling things and throw any values/morals away. Your a business. Not a church.

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