Ikea praised by Usdaw as its staff wages go beyond new Living Wage rates

Ikea's latest pay deal for its staff exceeds the real Living Wage and is a success for Usdaw’s campaign for at least £10 per hour for retail workers.
“Ikea has long been a Living Wage employer and we are pleased to see them become one of a few retailers to pay more than the recommended rate."
// Ikea has been met with praise from Usdaw as its latest pay deal for its staff exceeds the real Living Wage
// The retailer will now pay its staff at least £11.30 an hour in London and £10.10 in the rest of the country

Retail trade union Usdaw has welcomed Ikea’s latest pay increase, which goes beyond the new real Living Wage rates, ensuring staff will be paid at least £11.30 an hour in London and £10.10 in the rest of the country.

Usdaw National Officer Dave Gill commented on the news and said: “Usdaw has been in discussions with IKEA about increasing hourly rates and to pay staff at least £10 per hour,”

“Usdaw and our members are very pleased to hear today that, following these discussions, the company has agreed to pay 20p, and 25p in London, above the new Living Wage rate from January, which is over £10 per hour for all staff.


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“IKEA has long been a Living Wage employer and we are pleased to see them become one of a few retailers to pay more than the recommended rate,”

“If retail is to recover, thrive and prosper employers need to invest in staff and that means decent pay, fair contracts and secure jobs. Usdaw’s campaign for a new deal for workers continues and we hope many other retailers will follow IKEA’s lead.”

Usdaw’s New Deal for Workers calls for:

  • A minimum wage of at least £10 per hour for all workers, ending rip-off youth rates and providing a living wage.
  • Minimum contract of 16 hours per week, for everyone who wants it, that reflects normal hours worked and a ban on zero-hour contracts.
  • Better sick pay for all workers, from day one, at average earnings.
  • Protection at work – respect for shopworkers, abuse is not a part of the job.
  • A proper social security system, Universal Credit does not provide a safety net.
  • Job security, with day one employment rights for unfair dismissal and redundancy.
  • Fair treatment and equality for all workers, including equal pay.
  • A voice at work, stop rogue employers refusing to engage with trade unions and end ‘fire and rehire’.

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1 COMMENT

  1. The difference? The one approach is the Brexit Approach. The other? The EU Approach. For those who had their heads smuggled into voting against their best interests, here it is. Clear to see.

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