More than half Londoners willing to pay more for sustainable fashion

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More than half Londoners willing to pay more for sustainable fashion, according to OnBuy
Only 25% of Londoners consider the environmental friendliness concept or message when deciding to increase their purchasing and/or spending intentions on sustainable fashion.
// 57% of Londoners willing to buy more or pay more for sustainable fashion if they are good value for money
// Londoners search for the term “sustainable fashion” online 1900 times per month
// Londoners rank ethical and fair trade/labour practices as most important attributes of sustainable fashion

New research has revealed that more than half of shoppers in the national capital are willing to pay more for sustainable fashion.

According to research from online marketplace OnBuy, 57 per cent of Londoners are willing to buy more or pay more for sustainable fashion if they believe the products represent good value for money.

It comes as OnBuy analysed new findings from KPMG, which surveyed 1000 Londoners to identify the features they most align with their definition of sustainable fashion.

The ecommerce retailer found that, at 48 per cent, Londoners ranked ethical and fair trade/labour practices as the most important attributes of sustainable fashion.


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Thereafter, 31 per cent believed the use of no hazardous chemicals as well as a pollution-free production process as crucial elements towards their perception of sustainable fashion.

Thirty per cent equally deemed high quality products and biodegradable or sustainable packaging as important aspects in their understanding of what sustainable fashion should entail.

Meanwhile, 17 per cent considered the use of organic materials – such as cotton, wool or silk – as a key component of sustainable fashion.

Twelve per cent felt the same about harnessing upcycled materials, the process of old, worn-out or damaged materials converted into new pieces of clothing.

More than half Londoners willing to pay more for sustainable fashion, according to OnBuy
(Image: OnBuy)

Only two per cent of Londoners surveyed associated sharing or rental services when they thought of sustainable fashion – schemes in which consumers pay to use clothing, footwear and accessories for a defined short period of time before returning them back.

Slightly above, just six per cent of Londoners felt a retailer having a take-back programme – like providing customers a small incentive like vouchers when they drop off any unwanted clothing for recycling – embodied their idea of sustainable fashion.

OnBuy also sought to discover the factors that would most encourage Londoners to buy more/pay more for sustainable fashion.

While it found more than half would be willing to pay more for sustainable fashion, 29 per cent are happy to search and shop for sustainable fashion products if the purchasing avenues and process to do so is convenient enough.

Meanwhile, only 25 per cent contemplate the environmental friendliness concept or message of a brand when deciding to increase their purchasing and/or spending intentions on sustainable fashion.

More than half Londoners willing to pay more for sustainable fashion, according to OnBuy
(Image: OnBuy)

OnBuy also utilised Google’s keyword planner tool to find out that Londoners search for the term “sustainable fashion” online 1900 times per month.

“Sustainable fashion is now more than a fancy buzzword,” OnBuy chief executive Cas Paton said.

“Retailers are making a conscious effort to reduce the negative environmental impact different parts of their operations/processes maybe causing.

“Likewise, brands are actively introducing various initiatives to encourage and help their customers to become more environmentally friendly.

“Despite this, people still have varying perceptions of what sustainable fashion truly is.

“This research certainly highlights the actions taken by brands which consumers most regard to be under the umbrella of sustainable fashion – with some very surprising outcomes.”

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