Selfridges doubles sustainable labelling scheme

643
Selfidges introduces six new labelling categories as it more than doubles its Buying Better labelling scheme
The Buying Better labels appear on over 3000 Selfridges products from over 100 brands within homeware, fashion and beauty.
// Selfidges introduces six new labelling categories as it more than doubles its Buying Better labelling scheme
// The sustainable labelling scheme was first launched in 2017
// Selfridges says almost 3/4 of people think retailers can do more to educate & guide consumers to shop more sustainably

Selfridges has doubled its sustainable labelling scheme with the launch of six new categories to help educate and guide customers to shop with more environmental awareness.

The new labels in the department store’s Buying Better scheme highlight specific sustainable product attributes, including responsible leather, reducing waste, vegan, forest friendly, cruelty free and supporting communities.

The labels appear on over 3000 products from over 100 brands within homeware, fashion and beauty.


 

READ MORE:


The expansion more than doubles the scope of the Buying Better scheme in store and online, two years after it was first introduced.

Selfridges said it worked with its brand partners to identify products which met the eligibility criteria before adding the Buying Better labels in store and online.

“We know our customers care more than ever about the products they buy and they want clear information from us about them,” Selfridges sustainability director Daniella Vega said.

“With just 10 years left to secure a sustainable future, collaboration – from working with our brands to create products which are better for people and the planet, to being part of cross-industry coalitions such as the Fashion Pact of which we are a founding signatory – is key to achieving the level of change we need to see.”

The introduction of the new labels comes after Selfridges own research found that 74 per cent consumers believe retailers can do more to educate and guide consumers to shop more sustainably.

The department store also said that 57 per cent of British shoppers expected more action from luxury retailers compared to those on the high street when it came to tackling sustainability.

Meanwhile, 72 per cent and 64 per cent of consumers were concerned with reducing waste and buying cruelty-free products respectively.

In September 2019 Selfridges was one of the original signatories of the Fashion Pact, a coalition of influential fashion brands and businesses working together on a series of commitments climate, biodiversity and oceans to reduce the industry’s environmental impact.

Click here to sign up to Retail Gazette‘s free daily email newsletter