Halfords launches petition to allow e-scooters on roads amid rising demand

Halfords launches petition to allow e-scooters on roads amid rising demand
// Halfords launches petition calling for the government to legalise the use of all e-scooters on public roads
// It says e-scooters were becoming increasingly popular, with 1 in 7 adults now owning one

Halfords has launched a a petition to call for a change in the law to allow e-scooters to be ridden on public roads amid rising demand for the mode of transport.

The retail giant said e-scooters were becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to public transport, with around one in seven adults now owning one.

A survey of 2000 adults showed around two in five were in favour of e-scooters, with the advantages of using them to commute including avoiding congestion, saving time on parking, and saving money.


READ MORE: Halfords posts “best ever Christmas week” as Brits swap cars for bikes


Halfords said its poll suggested that if e-scooters were legal to ride on public roads, one in three adults would consider using them for shorter journeys, while almost as many might swap their car for one.

“Our petition calls for the Government to legalise the use of all e-scooters on public roads and for the UK laws to catch up with the rest of the world,” Halfords cycling director Paul Tomlinson said.

“They are legal and allowed on the streets of many countries across Europe and the rest of the world.

“Any new regulations should deliver safer roads, and ensure that e-scooter road users behave responsibly and with due care and attention, but the current blanket ban on e-scooters does not offer this.

“Their safe use has the potential to change the way we travel and can help address pollution and congestion problems.

“The government has already recognised the potential for this with the introduction of rental trials.”

with PA Wires

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