West End footfall reaches 79% of pre-pandemic levels as Plan B restrictions ease

The easing of Plan B Covid restrictions in England over the past week has seen consumers returning to London’s West End
“Footfall figures for the first full week since the easing of Plan B restrictions show that London’s West End has experienced a promising boost." - Artjom Hatsaturjants.
// Footfall in London’s West End was up on average up 10% week on week between 27 January and 2 February
// Weekend footfall was up by 11% from the previous weekend

The easing of Plan B Covid restrictions in England over the past week has led consumers to return to London’s West End.

In the first full week after the rules were loosened, footfall in the area reached 79% of pre-pandemic levels, the New West End Company which represents 600 businesses on Oxford Street, Regent Street, Bond Street and Mayfair, has reported.

Footfall from Thursday January 27 to Wednesday February 2, was the highest since November 2021 before the Omicron variant emerged.


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Morning commuter footfall was up on average 9% week on week and weekend footfall was up by 11% from the previous weekend.

Artjom Hatsaturjants, head of business intelligence at New West End Company, said: “Footfall figures for the first full week since the easing of Plan B restrictions show that London’s West End has experienced a promising boost, with footfall this weekend back to 79% of pre-pandemic levels – the highest level we have seen since November 2021.

“We have also seen morning commuter footfall growing at a pace. The return of office employees and UK visitors will no doubt be a relief to retailers and hospitality businesses in the district.”

However, one key group is still missing in big numbers — international tourists.

Hatsaturjants added “We must now see concerted efforts to attract high-spending overseas tourists back to the capital to help accelerate the recovery of London’s businesses from the challenges of the last two years.”

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1 COMMENT

  1. Greater London and especially Central London is dead. Home working and covid have change the way we work. Many restaurants have shuttered in Central London and many stores have too on lease expiry.

    Many banks have gone. They are a rarity in Central London these days and increasingly so in many other places too.

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