Selfridges “to create a calmer environment for autistic shoppers” with new quiet hour

Selfridges introduces a quiet shopping hour across its stores and office locations to support Neurodiversity Week
"We are proud of this positive step in our journey to creating a diverse, inclusive community where everyone is welcome."
// Selfridges introduces a quiet shopping hour across its stores and office locations to support Neurodiversity Week
// “We’ll be turning off our in-store music to create a calmer environment for autistic shoppers – and everyone who enjoys a bit of peace and quiet”

Selfridges has now launched a new quiet shopping hour across the business in a bid to create a more inclusive shopping experience for all its shoppers.

In a Linkedin post, the luxury department store retailer said: “We understand that shopping experiences for people with autism spectrum conditions, sensory sensitivities, and mental health conditions like anxiety, can be stressful.”

Announced during Neurodiversity Week, Selfridges is introducing Quiet Hour to all its stores and office locations which will take place every Wednesday from 10am -11am.


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The business said that by offering a Quiet Hour, customers have the the opportunity to shop in an environment that is catered to their needs “which means lowering or turning off music and, where possible, switching off screens to create a calmer, less overwhelming experience.”

“We are encouraging team members to take part in our offices and back of house areas by being respectful of volume during this time. We are also creating quiet spaces for reflection across our locations where team members are encouraged to relax and take a moment for themselves,” the retailer added.

“We are proud of this positive step in our journey to creating a diverse, inclusive community where everyone is welcome.”

The move follows in the footsteps of other retailers offering quiet hours, including Superdrug – which offers a quiet hour every Sunday, alongside Tesco and The Entertainer.

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1 COMMENT

  1. It’s not just about it being quiet. Many people with autism cannot cope with the lights shopping centres have. Xmas is a nightmare. LED lights cause me seizures and that on top of noise and all other sensory issues make going to a shopping centre impossible. Online is the better option because I know I won’t have a sensory reaction. You need to stop LED lights, especially blue lights because they are the worse. Listen to people with autism not just the people that make policy. We are the ones who know best.

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