Morrisons saves 100 tonnes of food from going to waste with partnership

Morrisons too good to go food waste
Over the last year, the Big 4 grocer has sold 100,000 bags of unsold food
// Morrisons’ partnership with Too Good to Go has saved 100 tonnes of food from going to waste
// Customers can download the Too Good To Go app and select a local Morrisons store to purchase a bag of unsold food worth at least £10
// Through the service, shoppers can get £10 of fruit, veg, deli and bakery products for £3.09

Morrisons has found that its partnership with food waste prevention app Too Good to Go has saved 100 tonnes of food from going to waste.

The Too Good to Go service aims to prevent edible food being thrown away, and is available in the majority of Morrisons UK stores.

Customers can download the app, select a local store to purchase a bag of unsold food worth at least £10, and then pay through the app before collecting a “Magic Bag” during a given collection window.


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Over the last year, the Big 4 grocer has sold 100,000 bags of unsold food.

Through the service, shoppers can get £10 of fruit, veg, deli and bakery products for £3.09.

“We’re making good food affordable for everyone and working with the Too Good to Go app also reduces food waste,” Morrisons head of corporate responsibility Steven Butts said.

“Customers love it because they save money and the environment at same time.”

Too Good To Go UK country manager Paschalis Loucaides said: “Working with Morrisons has proven just how impactful collaboration is to reduce food waste.

“By saving 100,000 meals in the last year alone, we have been able to ensure that food is eaten and enjoyed instead of wasted.”

Separately, Morrisons has pushed through with its sustainability plans after removing glitter entirely from its own-brand ranges of greetings cards, gift wrap, seasonal items and horticulture in stores earlier this month.

This means all Morrisons-branded cards, crackers, wrapping paper, present bags, flowers, plants and wreaths are now 100 per cent glitter-free, and marks the latest initiative in the Big 4 retailer’s war on plastic.

Glitter is made from tiny particles of plastic and is an ecological hazard if it becomes dispersed on land, rivers and oceans – where it takes hundreds of years to degrade.

Marks & Spencer and Waitrose have already implemented similar measures on its Christmas items, while Selfridges pledged to ban all plastic-based cosmetic glitter by 2021.

Morrisons confirmed it also removed all plastic toys from its Christmas crackers, making them completely plastic-free this year.

All contents in its Christmas crackers – such as games and gifts – will now be made out of paper, metal or wood and are designed to be kept and reused.

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